“By implementing waste reduction strategies and working with carbon offset registries, Indian businesses can turn their waste reduction efforts into a valuable asset while also contributing to a more sustainable future.”

As the world faces the challenge of climate change, the waste reduction has become a crucial issue. Fortunately, waste reduction can not only help the environment but also earn carbon credits. Many Indian businesses and projects have successfully implemented waste reduction strategies”By implementing waste reduction strategies and working with carbon offset registries, Indian businesses can turn their waste reduction efforts into a valuable asset while also contributing to a more sustainable future.” and earned carbon credits through the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) methodologies. In this article, we will discuss the VCS methodology applicable to waste recycling, list Indian projects that have received carbon credits, and provide sample calculations for GHG emission reductions.

VCS Methodology for Waste Recycling

The VCS methodology applicable to waste recycling is VM0011, which is also known as the “Emission Reductions from Recycling of Materials in Solid Waste Management.” The VM0011 methodology provides a framework for measuring GHG emission reductions resulting from the recycling of waste materials. The methodology is applicable to projects that implement waste recycling strategies, such as composting, anaerobic digestion, or waste-to-energy programs.

Indian Projects with Carbon Credits under VM0011

Several Indian projects have successfully implemented waste recycling strategies and earned carbon credits under the VM0011 methodology. Some of these projects include:

  1. Dhapa II Dumpsite Gas Recovery Project: This project involves capturing and flaring landfill gas emitted from the Dhapa II dumpsite in Kolkata. The project has reduced GHG emissions by over 680,000 metric tons and has generated over 1.3 million carbon credits.
  2. Municipal Solid Waste Management Project in Nagpur: This project involves the collection, transportation, and processing of municipal solid waste in Nagpur. The project includes a waste-to-energy plant that generates electricity from the processed waste. The project has reduced GHG emissions by over 330,000 metric tons and has generated over 860,000 carbon credits.
  3. Waste-to-Energy Project in Hyderabad: This project involves converting municipal solid waste into electricity through a waste-to-energy plant in Hyderabad. The project has reduced GHG emissions by over 60,000 metric tons and has generated over 230,000 carbon credits.

Sample Calculations for GHG Emission Reductions

To estimate the GHG emission reductions resulting from waste recycling projects, the VM0011 methodology uses a baseline scenario and a project scenario. The baseline scenario represents the GHG emissions that would have occurred if the project had not been implemented. The project scenario represents the actual GHG emissions resulting from the project. The GHG emission reduction is calculated as the difference between the baseline and project scenarios.

Here is a sample calculation for estimating GHG emission reductions resulting from a waste-to-energy project:

Baseline Scenario:

  • Annual waste generation: 100,000 metric tons
  • Waste disposal method: landfilling
  • Methane generation: 50,000 metric tons of CO2e per year

Project Scenario:

  • Annual waste generation: 100,000 metric tons
  • Waste disposal method: waste-to-energy
  • GHG emissions from energy generation: 10,000 metric tons of CO2e per year

GHG Emission Reduction:

  • Baseline scenario emissions: 50,000 metric tons of CO2e per year
  • Project scenario emissions: 10,000 metric tons of CO2e per year
  • GHG emission reduction: 40,000 metric tons of CO2e per year

Table Summary of Indian Projects with Carbon Credits

Project NameMethodologyGHG Emission Reduction (metric tons CO2e)Carbon Credits Generated
Dhapa II Dumpsite Gas Recovery ProjectVM0011680,0001,300,000
Municipal Solid Waste Management Project in NagpurVM0011330,000860,000

In addition to the VM0011 methodology, the VCS also has other methodologies that can be used to earn carbon credits through waste recycling. These include VM0008 for methane capture from sewage treatment plants, VM0007 for emissions reductions from improved waste management practices, and VM0025 for emissions reductions from composting.

There are several Indian projects that have successfully earned carbon credits through waste recycling. For example, the Biogas Project at the Tamil Nadu Newsprint and Papers Limited (TNPL) plant in Karur has generated over 300,000 carbon credits by producing biogas from paper mill effluent. The project, which was registered under the VM0011 methodology, has reduced greenhouse gas emissions by over 100,000 metric tons of CO2e.

Another example is the TATA Power Delhi Distribution Limited (TPDDL) waste-to-energy project, which has generated over 250,000 carbon credits through the processing of municipal solid waste. The project, which is registered under the VM0007 methodology, has reduced greenhouse gas emissions by over 250,000 metric tons of CO2e.

To estimate the GHG emission reduction and the number of carbon credits that can be earned through waste recycling projects, sample calculations are required. These calculations take into account the type and amount of waste being processed, the technology being used, and the baseline emissions from landfilling or incineration.

Here is an example of a sample calculation for a waste recycling project using the VM0011 methodology:

Assumptions:

  • 10,000 metric tons of waste processed annually
  • 70% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions compared to landfilling
  • Baseline emissions from landfilling: 0.5 metric tons CO2e per metric ton of waste
  • Project emissions: 0.15 metric tons CO2e per metric ton of waste

Calculation:

Baseline emissions = 10,000 metric tons x 0.5 metric tons CO2e/metric ton = 5,000 metric tons CO2e Project emissions = 10,000 metric tons x 0.15 metric tons CO2e/metric ton = 1,500 metric tons CO2e GHG emission reduction = Baseline emissions – Project emissions = 3,500 metric tons CO2e Number of carbon credits earned = GHG emission reduction / VCU per metric ton CO2e Assuming a VCU value of $5 per metric ton CO2e, the project would earn $17,500 in carbon credits annually.

In summary, waste recycling projects present a valuable opportunity for Indian businesses to earn carbon credits while also reducing their environmental impact. By following the applicable VCS methodologies, implementing waste reduction strategies, and working with carbon offset registries, businesses can turn their waste reduction efforts into a valuable asset while also contributing to a more sustainable future.